HCPLive Network

Urban HIV Infection Mainly Due to Male-Male Sexual Contact

 
FRIDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of HIV infections in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), smaller metropolitan areas, and nonmetropolitan areas in the United States and Puerto Rico can be attributed to male-to-male sexual contact, according to research published in the Nov. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Hollie Clark, M.P.H., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues estimated the number of HIV infections in newly diagnosed individuals in 2010 and classified them by transmission category and location. The authors focused on geographic differences in the prevalence of HIV infection from male-to-male sexual contact among individuals age 13 and older in the United States and Puerto Rico.

The authors note that the largest percentage of HIV infections in MSAs, smaller metropolitan areas, and nonmetropolitan areas can be attributed to male-to-male sexual contact (62.1, 56.1, and 53.7 percent, respectively). Of the cases of HIV infection due to male-to-male sexual contact (28,851 cases), 81.7 percent were in MSAs, 48.4 percent of which resided in seven MSAs that represented 31.7 percent of the total population of individuals aged 13 years and older.

"The results of this analysis underscore the uneven geographic distribution of the burden of HIV infection in MSAs in the United States and Puerto Rico," write the authors of an editorial note. "The geographic disparity in HIV burden also indicates a need to target men who have sex with men who bear a large percentage of the burden of infection in areas where persons are at greatest risk for HIV transmission."
 

Full Text

 
Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Further Reading
Adolescent transgender patients face many challenges, as do the medical professionals who care for them. What is the best way to manage transgender youths? This is a complex question with answers that rely on a case-by-case, ethical approach
Monitoring patients’ own intestinal immune responses, researchers at Yale University have identified some of the bacterial culprits driving inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.
A major demonstration project designed to gauge the effectiveness of bundled payments exposed the complications of implementing such a system. Officials say the 3-year study fizzled after participation waned and the number of applicable cases proved too few to be statistically relevant.
New research suggests that oral immunotherapy may trigger anaphylaxis in an unusually high percentage of asthmatic teenagers with high-risk food allergies who failed to adhere to their management plan.
For patients with stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure, ivabradine does not improve outcomes, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study was published to coincide with the annual European Society of Cardiology Congress, held from Aug. 30 to Sept. 3 in Barcelona, Spain.
For patients after an acute coronary syndrome event, darapladib inhibition of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 does not reduce the risk of major coronary events, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study was published to coincide with the annual European Society of Cardiology Congress, held from Aug. 30 to Sept. 3 in Barcelona, Spain.
A 3-year study of a product meant to help patients dealing with a wide range of conditions including diabetes, hypertension, and weight loss showed positive results according to manufacturer EnteroMedics, Inc.
More Reading