HCPLive Network

Wait Time to Lumbar Discectomy Linked to Post-Op Pain

TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The likelihood of experiencing worse pain at six months post-surgery is increased with a waiting time of 12 weeks or more for elective surgical lumbar discectomy (ESLD), according to a study published in the Dec. 1 issue of The Spine Journal.

Jeffrey A. Quon, D.C., Ph.D., from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, and colleagues assessed whether a system-imposed delay in treatment (a longer waiting time) for ESLD correlates with residual postoperative pain in a cohort of 291 patients, aged 16 years or older with advanced imaging-confirmed sciatica because of herniated lumbar disc, but excluding those with significant comorbidity or emergency indications for surgery. Pain intensity was assessed on the 11-point numerical rating scale at waitlist enrollment and six months postoperatively.

The researchers found that at six months, long-wait patients were 80 percent more likely than short-wait patients to experience higher ordinal pain intensity in unadjusted analyses (unadjusted proportional odds ratio [POR], 1.8). After controlling for all imbalances in measured confounders the association persisted, with long-wait patients 70 percent more likely to report worse pain (adjusted POR, 1.7).

"In jurisdictions where highly constrained access to ESLD is managed through waitlists, the expected waiting time for the operation could be an informative deciding criterion for patients with otherwise unresolved preferences for operative treatment," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the medical device industry.

Abstract


Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Further Reading
As the 2 Americans stricken with Ebola continue to receive treatment in Atlanta, a new potential case of the deadly virus has been reported in California.
There has been a shift from inpatient to outpatient surgery for commonly performed urological procedures, which has coincided with increasing rates of failure to rescue mortality, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in BJU International.
New research about food allergies that can trigger severe reactions such as anaphylaxis has shown that cooking some foods can prevent attacks and help build tolerance.
Many control psoriasis-ridden skin only to find traces of discolored patches in its wake. A study by the Milstein Medical Research Program at The Rockefeller University has uncovered the correlation between skin discoloration and psoriasis, providing opportunities of treatment for pigmentation changes within eczema and acne as well.
Orthopedic surgeon Bert Mandelbaum is a pioneering researcher and the creator of a program that has drastically reduced ACL tears among young female athletes.
A postdischarge intervention including free medication results in higher rates of smoking cessation at 6 months, compared with standard discharge care among hospitalized adult smokers, according to a study published in the Aug. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
Newborn screening programs in the United States have identified severe combined immunodeficiency in one in 58,000, with high survival seen in SCID-affected infants, according to a study published in the Aug. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
More Reading