HCPLive Network

Online CME (Almost): Iowa Law School Offers Healthcare Reform Class

A University of Iowa College of Law class that examines the legal implications of the health care reform law will be offered online for anyone who wants to learn more about the issue.

The class sessions of the Health Law Colloquium are held every Thursday except Thanksgiving from 2:20 to 4:20 p.m. Central Time, starting Aug. 26 and ending Dec. 2. Those who wish to participate in the class live can do so through Elluminate, the university's distance education program.

Click here to register and log in.

Class sessions will also be videotaped and put online afterward, along with PowerPoints and other supporting documents. The material will be available for download.

The class will analyze legal issues presented by the country’s new health care policy with professors and experts from across the UI campus and beyond. They will analyze the law from such legal perspectives as economics, human rights, anti-trust, insurance, employment, poverty and constitutional.

Source: University of Iowa


Further Reading
Results of a large international study known as SIGNIFY showed ivabradine offered no benefit to patients who had stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure (CHF).
Novartis plans to soon file a new drug application with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its investigational heart failure drug LCZ696. A report showing the drug works better than enalapril to prevent adverse cardiac events was released at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Barcelona, Spain Aug. 30 and published online in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).
Adolescent transgender patients face many challenges, as do the medical professionals who care for them. What is the best way to manage transgender youths? This is a complex question with answers that rely on a case-by-case, ethical approach
Monitoring patients’ own intestinal immune responses, researchers at Yale University have identified some of the bacterial culprits driving inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.
Having regular family meals may help protect teens from the harmful mental health effects of "cyberbullying," a new study suggests. The study was published online Sept. 1 in JAMA Pediatrics.
A major demonstration project designed to gauge the effectiveness of bundled payments exposed the complications of implementing such a system. Officials say the 3-year study fizzled after participation waned and the number of applicable cases proved too few to be statistically relevant.
The quality of Americans' diets has improved somewhat but remains poor overall, and dietary disparity between the rich and poor is growing, a new study shows. Education also played a role in dietary quality, which was lowest and improved more slowly among people who had 12 years or less of school, according to the study published online Sept. 1 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
More Reading