HCPLive Network

Online CME (Almost): Iowa Law School Offers Healthcare Reform Class

A University of Iowa College of Law class that examines the legal implications of the health care reform law will be offered online for anyone who wants to learn more about the issue.

The class sessions of the Health Law Colloquium are held every Thursday except Thanksgiving from 2:20 to 4:20 p.m. Central Time, starting Aug. 26 and ending Dec. 2. Those who wish to participate in the class live can do so through Elluminate, the university's distance education program.

Click here to register and log in.

Class sessions will also be videotaped and put online afterward, along with PowerPoints and other supporting documents. The material will be available for download.

The class will analyze legal issues presented by the country’s new health care policy with professors and experts from across the UI campus and beyond. They will analyze the law from such legal perspectives as economics, human rights, anti-trust, insurance, employment, poverty and constitutional.

Source: University of Iowa


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