HCPLive Network

Top Dermatology iPhone and iPad Apps

These apps for the iPhone and iPad are designed to help physicians evaluate and diagnose a wide range of dermatologic diseases and conditions. Because an accurate diagnosis of many skin conditions requires physicians to recognize key visual symptoms and clues, the images and references incorporated into these apps make them ideal point-of-care tools.

iRash
Description: This app is “a basic dermatology reference to over 40 common skin conditions, with basics of causation, diagnosis, and treatment, as well as a representative image. It may be used to assist your own clinical judgment in establishing a diagnosis or as a patient educational aide.” Click here to read a review of this product from iMedicalApp.com, a member of the HCPLive network.
Cost: $2.99
Memory: 1.0MB
Requirements: OS 3.1.2+
Compatible with iPad: YES
Developed by GraySoap Design

A2Z of Dermatology
Description: Features more than 200 MCQ questions focusing on a wide range of topics in dermatology, “based on real life cases and relevant management rather than esoterica or rarities.” Covers everything from acne rosacea to urticaria and viral warts. Based on the text Quick Reference Atlas of Dermatology by Dr Ian Williams & Dr Vivienne Ankrett.
Cost: $3.99
Memory: 2.0MB
Requirements: OS 3.0+
Compatible with iPad: YES
Developed by Dr. Neil Paul

Visual Dx
Description: This app “combines physician-reviewed clinical information” with “thousands of medical images from renowned physician and institutional collections.” With this app, physicians can compare medical images to their patient’s presentation; retrieve differential Dx advice based on the patient’s symptoms; view “ICD-9 codes, diagnostic pearls, best tests, and more;” and look up “medication-induced diseases by drug for over 700 medications.” Click here to read a review of this product from iMedicalApp.com, a member of the HCPLive network.
Cost: FREE
Memory: 9.7MB
Requirements: OS 3.0+
Compatible with iPad: YES
Developed by Logical Images

xSCC Skin
Description: This app is “a clinical disease module in which you learn about [squamous cell cancer of the skin] SCC, the warning signs, how it is diagnosed and treated, the prognosis, and the recommended follow-up course.” Designed for patients to help them communicate with their physician, this app allows patients to record and document skin lesions and create a visual record of the skin over time.
Cost: $3.99
Memory: 0.7MB
Requirements: OS 3.1.3+
Compatible with iPad: NO
Developed by neXante

DermConsult
Description: Developed after “many years of cooperation between highly qualified specialists in the areas of programming and medicine,” this app is useful for narrowing the range of possible dermatologic diseases and provides diagnostic recommendations.
Cost: $59.99
Memory: 0.1MB
Requirements: OS 3.1.2+
Compatible with iPad: YES
Developed by iMedAppsTeam (iMAT)


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