HCPLive Network
Latest Cardiology Headlines
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
US heart experts recommend doctors use a 14-point checklist rather than an electrocardiogram when evaluating young people for underlying heart disease that could result in sudden cardiac arrest.
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Aerobic exercise leading to strong cardiorespiratory fitness can delay a man's onset of age-related high blood pressure, researchers report in the Sept. 23 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
More than one-quarter of hospital medicine services were rated by ordering physicians as at least a partially defensive order, according to a research letter published online Sept. 15 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
Monday, September 15, 2014
By Gale Scott
Using an experimental and highly sensitive test for cardiac troponin, a team of Johns Hopkins researchers found undetected signs of heart muscle damage in people with diabetes and pre-diabetes. That may suggest that hypoglycemia directly damages the heart.
Monday, September 15, 2014
Errata, including those that may materially change the interpretation of data, are frequent in medical publications, according to a study published in the August issue of The American Journal of Medicine.
Monday, September 15, 2014
Unstable anticoagulation predicts warfarin adverse effects regardless of time in therapeutic range, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.
Monday, September 15, 2014
The new consumer retail market in U.S. healthcare is necessary and will benefit consumers, and as consumers take on more costs of care, access to information to help them make informed decisions is crucial, according to a recent white paper published by Vitals.
Friday, September 12, 2014
Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants exhibit variable effects on coagulation assays, according to a study published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Friday, September 12, 2014
A family doctor who was involved in a malpractice suit describes the impact on her practice of medicine in an article published online in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.
Thursday, September 11, 2014
By Andrew Smith
The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved a new algorithm that will enable many smart phones to detect signs of atrial fibrillation.
Email Signup
Physician's Money Digest
American hospitals reported 38.6 million stays in 2011 and in 24.3 million of those visits, some type of medical procedure was performed (often multiple procedures).
A new study finds narrow health networks can help reduce healthcare costs without impacting the quality of care patients receive.