HCPLive Network
Latest Infectious Disease Headlines
Friday, October 24, 2014
By HCPLive staff
In remarks delivered at the American Academy of Family Physicians 2014 Assembly, HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell spoke about the ongoing response to the Ebola outbreak, improving health care delivery, the Affordable Care Act, and the Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative.
Friday, October 24, 2014
By Gale Scott
New York and New Jersey health officials announced today that all health care workers returning from caring for patients in Ebola hot zones in West Africa will have to go into quarantine for 21 days. The new policy is stricter than the current one recommended by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that calls for health monitoring for 21 days. It was that policy that allowed Craig Spencer, MD to be out and about a day before he was diagnosed with Ebola Thursday and rushed to city-run Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan.
Friday, October 24, 2014
By Jeannette Wick
A non-inferiority study published in the October 6, 2014 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine looks at these drugs. The researchers report that prescribing β-lactam monotherapy may be as effective as the combination of a macrolide with a β-lactam in certain patients.
Friday, October 24, 2014
Targets of workplace bullying can offer chaos, report, or quest narratives about their experiences, and coworker response plays a role in narrative development, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in Management Communication Quarterly.
Friday, October 24, 2014
By Jeannette Wick
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) have become significant and costly problems—so significant, in fact, that many patients have a basic knowledge of MRSA just from news reports. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer a large selection of free tools to educate the public about MRSA and VRE.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
By Gale Scott
New York City has its first case of Ebola, confirmed tonight in Craig Spencer, MD, an emergency medicine specialist who recently returned from a volunteer stint caring for Ebola patients in Guinea, Africa for Doctors Without Borders. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene released a statement earlier today that Spencer, who works at New York Hospital/Columbia-Presbyterian in Manhattan had been rushed to Bellevue Hospital Center after he became ill with a high fever and gastro-intestinal symptoms. Mayor Bill Blasio provided further details at a news conference this evening.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
By Gale Scott
In what could be New York City’s first case of Ebola, a doctor identified by the NY Post as Craig Spencer, 33, MD an emergency medicine physician at New York Hospital/Columbia-Presbyterian was rushed to a special Ebola unit at city-run Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan. Spencer returned 10 days ago from a stint as a volunteer with Doctors without Borders, caring for Ebola victims in Guinea, one of three West African nations with major outbreaks.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
The US health care system ranks last compared to other industrialized nations when it comes to affordability and patient access, according to a new survey published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
By Jacqueline Gray
Researchers at Hong Kong University and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have identified a link between the influenza A viruses’ genetic diversity and severity of the infection.
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Hospital conversion to for-profit status is associated with improvements in financial margins, but has no effect on process quality metrics or mortality rates, according to a study published in the Oct. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association
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