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Latest Pulmonology Headlines
Thursday, October 23, 2014
Monitoring devices among intensive care patients set off 2.5 million alarms in one month at a U.S. hospital, a new study of "alarm fatigue" reveals. The research was published online Oct. 22 in PLOS ONE.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
The US health care system ranks last compared to other industrialized nations when it comes to affordability and patient access, according to a new survey published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
A patient's sex life is unlikely to suffer because of sleep apnea treatment, according to a new study scheduled to be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians, held from Oct. 25 to 30 in Austin, Texas.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
Over the last decade, mortality rates for patients undergoing surgical repair for aortic dissection have improved, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
By Jacqueline Gray
A collaborative effort from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and University of Florida has yielded plant leaves as a viable treatment for pulmonary hypertension.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
By Jacqueline Gray
Among Latinos, a Native American heritage was linked to a lower rate of asthma development, while an African lineage resulted in an increased asthma risk, researchers at University of California San Francisco found.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
By Jacqueline Gray
By comparing healthy and asthmatic lung cells post-infection, Imperial College London researchers believe they have discovered a new treatment target for asthma.
Thursday, October 23, 2014
By Jacqueline Gray
Prenatal exposure to phthalates, a chemical commonly used in cosmetics, increases children’s asthma risk, according to study results published in Environmental Health Perspectives.
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Hospital conversion to for-profit status is associated with improvements in financial margins, but has no effect on process quality metrics or mortality rates, according to a study published in the Oct. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Drug coupons could reduce patients' out-of-pocket costs by 60 percent, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.
Physician's Money Digest
Dollar bulls have hit a rocky patch. Buying the US currency has been the favored trade of currency investors since last year's taper tantrum, when the Federal Reserve said it would ease its bond-buying scheme as the economy showed signs of improvement.
Hospital quality data could have a big impact on how patients consume healthcare, but in a report released alongside the search revamp, Healthgrades makes the case that steering patients to only the most competent physicians can have wider implications for the healthcare system.