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Diabetes 
The MD Magazine Diabetes condition center provides clinical news and articles, information about upcoming conferences and meetings, updated clinical trial listings, and other resources.

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Household Chemicals and Diabetes: A Surprising Link
A new analysis indicates that a 25% reduction in exposure to certain household chemicals would reduce diabetes cases by approximately 13%, enough to save billions of dollars in annual health costs.
While one study found that taking vitamin D during pregnancy may hinder early ADHD symptoms, another recent study believes that gestational use of diabetes medications may lead to them.
As if egg-laying Australian mammals with webbed feet weren't fascinating enough, it turns out that their venom contains an insulin-stimulating peptide resistant to the forces that usually shorten its effectiveness in humans. Yes, they have venom.
Many previous studies have shown that smoking causes lung cancer, but a recently published report explained that heavy smokers with diabetes also have an increased risk of death unrelated to lung cancer.
With diabetes affecting so many parts of a patient's life sometimes it is not enough for one provider to help them manage the condition.
It can be easy for providers to be lost in numbers as they go through a busy day in the clinic. However, there is evidence to suggest that finding different ways to help patients beyond symptom management can do as much if not more to help improve quality of life overall.
Patients with diabetes face a number of challenges in their daily life, especially monitoring their blood glucose levels. There is work being done in the medical community to monitor other potential issues that can affect quality of life overall and how to address them.
Novo Nordisk’s Xultophy combines a previously marketed basal insulin with a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, and was yesterday accepted by the FDA. The company plans to have the drug on the market in 2017.
For men afflicted with type 2 diabetes and at high risk for heart attacks; however, relief might be found in an unlikely source – the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra (sildenafil).

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