HCPLive Network

Information for Attendees of the 2010 AAFP Scientific Assembly

While you’re at the 2010 American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) Scientific Assembly conference, please stop by our booth (#1449) and meet our editors, check out our MD Magazine iPad app, take part in the Physician’s Money Digest healthcare stock picking contest, and watch a heart-healthy cooking demonstration by Dr. Gourmet, Timothy S. Harlan, MD.

Registration
Although advanced registration is closed, click here to learn more about onsite registration, fees and payment options, badges and tickets, and more.

Schedules
There’s so much to do and see at the 2010 AAFP Scientific Assembly, so plan your time accordingly with the Schedule At-a-Glance. The Schedule Builder allows attendees to create a “personalized schedule of courses, special events and even personal appointments.” You can also view a schedule of plenary sessions, download a PDF of the daily course schedule, organized by day or topic. This year’s meeting also features a full schedule of satellite events.

Live Streaming Video of the Opening Ceremony of the 2010 AAFP Scientific Assembly
Even if you’re not able to make it to Denver for the first day of the conference, you can still watch live streaming video of the opening keynote, featuring US Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, MD, and the new AAFP President, Roland Goertz, MD. The event begins at 3:00pm, Wednesday, September 29.

CME at the 2010 Scientific Assembly
Registered attendees can click here to download the 2010 CME course handouts. Click here to view CME courses by date or topic. Go here to learn more about the AAFP’s hands-on clinical procedures workshops.

Special Events at the 2010 AAFP Scientific Assembly
There are a variety of special events scheduled to coincide with this year’s event, including a benefit for the AAFP Foundation, a 5K Family Fun Run/Walk, a celebrity reception and book signing, and a Special Interest Group in Emergency Medicine.

2010 AAFP Expo Hall
The expo hall is open September 30 – October 2, and will feature several special attractions, including The Learning Gallery, where attendees can “hear about exhibitors products, products in clinical development, disease state data, and physician-sponsored evidence-based studies;” the Publishers Pavilion, where attendees can “view books from major book publishers, connect to the Internet, report your CME, or stay up to date on world news;” and the Practice for the Future exhibit, where physicians can learn about the relationship of meaningful use and PCMH in an interactive environment.

The Product Theaters offer the chance to learn about new pharmaceutical products, services, and disease states; review the latest data and research findings; and ask product-specific questions of key expert physicians.

The list of exhibitors and expo hall floor plan are both available for download.

Looking for Things to Do While You’re in Denver?
Click here to read about various city tours that explore the area’s best shops, restaurants, landmarks, historic locales, and more.

Further Reading
Early reports from the Safety and Appropriateness of Growth hormone treatments in Europe (SAGhE) project noted increased cardiac and cerebrovascular mortality in adults who were treated for stature problems as children. In addition, other studies have linked stroke risk to short stature in general, hypothesizing that shorter people have increased metabolic risks.
Endocrinologists generally see middle-aged people who have developed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subsequent to overnutrition (or overeating) and weight gain. Most clinicians tend to forget that low caloric intake, or undernutrition, in the prenatal period or during a child’s formative years also seems to increase the risk of the T2DM later in life.
Why do some allergic reactions produce only relatively mild symptoms while others trigger anaphylaxis and eventual death?
More Reading
Early reports from the Safety and Appropriateness of Growth hormone treatments in Europe (SAGhE) project noted increased cardiac and cerebrovascular mortality in adults who were treated for stature problems as children. In addition, other studies have linked stroke risk to short stature in general, hypothesizing that shorter people have increased metabolic risks.