HCPLive Network

AAN 2012: Interview with Dr. Zigmond about Exercise and Parkinson’s Disease Study [Podcast]

In this interview, Michael Zigmond, PhD, Professor of Neurology at theUniversity of Pittsburgh, discusses why he became involved with studying Parkinson’s disease and his research on exercise and Parkinson’s disease which he will be presenting at this year's AAN conference.

When asked about how he began his research in Parkinson's disease, Zigmond said, "I became interested in catecholamines, which includes dopamine and norepinephrine primarily, as a graduate student. There was evidence that they were affected by stress and I was interested in looking at the adaptive effects of stress."

It was upon collaborating with colleague when Zigmond explained how he "discovered that... physicial exercise was what we would call 'neuroprotective.' If you had animals exercise before you expose them to a toxin like 6-Hydroxydopamine, the effects of the toxin on the animals' behavior and on the dopamine neurons themselves was reduced."


 


Further Reading
Researchers at Hong Kong University and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have identified a link between the influenza A viruses’ genetic diversity and severity of the infection.
The immune system is the new focus of much work on traumatic brain injury (TBI). In a challenge to the paradigm that the blood brain barrier prevents harmful leukocytes from entering the brain, a Texas team tried to neutralize the impact of these cells. Peripheral lymphocytes are activated after TBI. They may then act as potential antigen presenting cells and get into the brain, causing cells there to degenerate.
Hospital conversion to for-profit status is associated with improvements in financial margins, but has no effect on process quality metrics or mortality rates, according to a study published in the Oct. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association
The CDC announces monitoring for all passengers from 3 Ebola-stricken nations, part of increased surveillance efforts as new Ebola czar Ron Klain starts firs day of work. Meanwhile, Bentley, the dog confined because his owner Dallas nurse Nina Pham has the virus, is cleared to go home. NBC medical editor Nancy Snyderman released from her Princeton, NJ home quarantine, and the NBC cameraman stricken with the disease is now Ebola-free.
Drug coupons could reduce patients' out-of-pocket costs by 60 percent, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.
Depressive symptoms are associated with poorer long-term outcome in patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of The Spine Journal.
Tests and diagnostic procedures often help physicians discover conditions or formulate treatments, but researchers say some tests are used far more often than they are worth. Here are 5 tests and procedures physicians should think twice about before prescribing.
More Reading
Researchers at Hong Kong University and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have identified a link between the influenza A viruses’ genetic diversity and severity of the infection.