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Adopting a Centralized Glucose Management Program Improves Clinical Outcomes in General Hospital Patients with Diabetes

 
By adopting a comprehensive set of case management policies for the care of diabetic and hyperglycemic patients, Johns Hopkins Hospital improved in-hospital mortality rate, reduced length of stay, and reduced hyperglycemia, according to an oral presentation given at the American Diabetes Association 73rd Scientific Sessions in Chicago, IL.
 
The management policies included the ADA policy, which was adopted totally, as well as the institution of a supervisor nurse, computerized order sets and insulin dosing, according to Elias Spanakis, MD, a physician in the division of endocrinology and metabolism at Johns Hopkins.
 
“In the general ward setting in the hospital, we use insulin to control hyperglycemia, we avoid giving pill medications, and sometimes advise patients not to eat,” explained Spanakis.
 
The changes over four years were associated with a 47% reduction in the mortality rate, and a $3,200 decrease in the cost of patient care, said Spanakis, who presented abstract 261-OR, “Impact of a Hospital-Wide Inpatient Glucose Management Program on Economic and Clinical Outcomes in the Non-Critical Care Setting.”


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