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As part of the American Gastroenterological Association's Winter Postgraduate Course, William D. Chey, MD, AGAF, from the University of Michigan, and Michael Camilleri, MD, AGAF, from the Mayo Clinic, discussed the best treatment course for patients with gastroparesis.
In the past few months patients diagnosed with Hepatitis C have seen what had been terminal conditions be cured. The technology used to find these curative treatments can now be applied to other conditions.
As new rules and regulations are applied in the health care, doctors are having to learn and adapt to make their practice survive and thrive.
Patients with gastrointestinal conditions can benefit from psychological counseling as well. The question is how much it can help and what it will do to help them with their symptoms.
For many gastrointestinal issues testing may not be sufficient to identify potential issues for patients and there may not be necessary treatments to help them get better. Work continues to improve both potential problems.
As part of the American Gastroenterological Association's Winter Postgraduate Course, William D. Chey, MD, AGAF, from the University of Michigan, and Michael Camilleri, MD, AGAF, from the Mayo Clinic, discussed the best treatment course for patients with gastroparesis.
The treatment of gastrointestinal conditions requires not only physical attention, but, in some cases, addressing psychological concerns as well.
Many patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease will respond to proton pump inhibitors, but for those who don't the treatment options can vary as much as the symptoms themselves.
For gastroenterologists, treating patients with esophageal issues is part of their daily practice. The introduction of high-resolution manometry could prove to be a useful took when treating these patients.