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Little Consistency in Intensive Treatment for Pediatric Asthma Across Hospitals
A recent survey of asthma treatment in intensive care units of children's hospitals in the US reveals wide variability between institutions in both medication and ventilation interventions.
A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with over 200,000 respondents in more than 20 states, indicates that adults working in the healthcare and social services field have higher incidence of asthma than people employed in any other industry.
Researchers have been exploring the “shock and kill” method to get rid of the virus for good, but a new study warns that the strategy could make things even worse.
A new analysis indicates that a 25% reduction in exposure to certain household chemicals would reduce diabetes cases by approximately 13%, enough to save billions of dollars in annual health costs.
Studies that found no connection are outliers, the authors of the new meta-analysis write. They believe the findings have been consistent enough to assert a certain link between pollution exposure and juvenile asthma, but they note that many important questions remain.
A team was able to demonstrate that spinal cord injury causes the relocation of some of the gut’s bacteria from sterile tissues to other locations throughout the body, and it appeared that these changes were linked to the activation of the immune system cells in the gut.
Empagliflozin was approved to reduce heart and stroke risk in patients with diabetes.
Several studies have shown that patients with sleep apnea are more likely than others to develop atrial fibrillation, but recent information indicates that any type of disrupted sleep may indicate an elevated risk.
At AHA 2016, Poushali Mukherjea, PhD, Bristol-Myers Squibb, was proud to present with her team 12 abstracts bringing in new scientific data covering real world data and sub analyses from their pivotal trial ARISTOTLE.

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