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Latest Specialty Headlines
Sunday, January 25, 2015
By Adam Hochron
As new rules and regulations are applied to the healthcare field doctors are having to learn and adapt to make their practice survive and thrive.
Sunday, January 25, 2015
By Adam Hochron
Patients with Gastrointestinal conditions can benefit from psychological counseling as well. The question is how much it can help and what it will do to help them with their symptoms.
Sunday, January 25, 2015
By Adam Hochron
For many gastrointestinal issues testing may not be sufficient to identify potential issues for patients and there may not be necessary treatments to help them get better. Work continues to improve both potential problems.
Sunday, January 25, 2015
By Adam Hochron
As part of the American Gastroenterological Association's Winter Postgraduate Course William D. Chey, MD, AGAF, from the University of Michigan and Michael Camilleri, MD, AGAF from the Mayo Clinic discussed the best treatment course for patients with gastroparesis.
Sunday, January 25, 2015
By Adam Hochron
The treatment of gastrointestinal conditions requires not only physical attention, but, in some cases, addressing psychological concerns as well.
Saturday, January 24, 2015
By Amy Jacob
“We really have entered this new era of direct acting antivirals, and as of this fall, we’ve finally laid to rest Interferon in the grave that we’ve all been wanting to put it in, for more than 2 decades,” opened Jacqueline G. O’Leary, MD, MPH, AGAF during her presentation at the 2015 AGA Clinical Congress of Gastroenterology & Hepatology.
Saturday, January 24, 2015
By Amy Jacob
"How do you move a glacier?" asked Lawrence Kosinski, MD, MBA, AGAF, FACG, managing partner of Illinois Gastroenterology Group (IGG) at the 2015 AGA Clinical Congress of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
Saturday, January 24, 2015
Current targets call for 150 minutes of weekly exercise -- or 30 minutes of physical activity at least five days a week -- to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although these standards don't need to be abandoned, they shouldn't be the primary message about exercise for inactive people, experts argue in two separate analyses published Jan. 21 in The BMJ.
Saturday, January 24, 2015
Nearly 5 percent of older Medicare beneficiaries seen in the emergency department have a hospital inpatient admission within seven days after discharge, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
Friday, January 23, 2015
For endoluminal procedures relying on barrier protection to avoid contamination, permeability of materials may not always be considered, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Ultrasound.
Friday, January 23, 2015
By Jeannette Y. Wick, RPh, MBA, FASCP
Facial fractures are a frequent cause for emergency department (ED) visits, costing the US economy about $1 billion every year. These fractures can occur due to a variety of traumas, including motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries, person-to-person violence, and falls. Identifying trends could help ED personnel and surgeons anticipate common problems.
Friday, January 23, 2015
By Gale Scott
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Bexsero, a Novartis vaccine to prevent meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitides serogroup B. It is meant for children age 10 and up and young adults through age 25.
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The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved secukinumab (Cosentyx/Novartis) for adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. The European Commission approved the same drug on Jan. 19. Its active ingredient is an antibody that binds to interleukin-17A and interferes with inflammation. The binding prevents that protein from triggering the inflammatory response that results in psoriasis patches.
The head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will leave her post at the end of February, just days before the law she helped implement faces its biggest legal test to date.
DUOPA (carbidopa and levodopa) enteral suspension for the treatment of motor fluctuations for people with advanced Parkinson's disease is administered via portable infusion pump that delivers carbidopa and levodopa directly into the small intestine for 16 continuous hours.
Physician's Money Digest
A bill slated for introduction in the United States Senate would generate funding for medical research by adding a new penalty for drug companies that break the law.
WiFi is quickly becoming ubiquitous in hotels, but that doesn't mean the WiFi will be fast, or free. The hotels in these 10 cities excel at providing quality, quick, wireless Internet.
Product News
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Bexsero, a Novartis vaccine to prevent meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitides serogroup B. It is meant for children age 10 and up and young adults through age 25.
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved secukinumab (Cosentyx/Novartis) for adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. The European Commission approved the same drug on Jan. 19. Its active ingredient is an antibody that binds to interleukin-17A and interferes with inflammation. The binding prevents that protein from triggering the inflammatory response that results in psoriasis patches.
The US Food and Drug Administration today approved Merck’s Gardasil 9, a vaccine that offers protection against 5 more types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) than original Gardasil. In addition to preventing cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers caused by HPV types 16 and 18 (those prevented by the older version of Gardasil) Gardasil 9 also prevents those cancers caused by HPV strains 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.
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