HCPLive

Admission for Syncope Increases Risk of Death, Cardio Events

 
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients without previous comorbidity admitted for syncope, there is a significant increased risk of all-cause mortality, stroke, and cardiovascular hospitalization, according to a study published online Dec. 12 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Martin Huth Ruwald, M.D., from Gentofte Hospital in Hellerup, Denmark, and colleagues used nationwide administrative registries to identify 37,017 patients with a first-time diagnosis of syncope and matched them in a 1:5 ratio with 185,085 control subjects. The median age was 47 years, and 47 percent were male.

The researchers found that in the syncope group there were 3,023 deaths (8.2 percent), yielding an event rate of 14.3 per 1,000 person-years (PY), compared with 14,251 deaths (7.1 percent) in the control population. There was a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.06; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.10) in the syncope group. In addition, there were significantly increased rates of cardiovascular hospitalization events (26.5 per 1,000 PY; HR, 1.74); recurrent syncope events (45.1 per 1,000 PY); stroke events (6.8 per 1,000 PY; HR, 1.35); and pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator events (4.2 per 1,000 PY; HR, 5.52).

"First admission for syncope in a population without previous comorbidity significantly predicts the risk of all-cause mortality, stroke, cardiovascular hospitalization, device implantation, and recurrent syncope," the authors write. "The study suggests that syncope in seemingly healthy persons may be a first symptom of a more severe underlying cardiovascular disease."

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

 
Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

As good news about new treatments for hepatitis C infections continues to dominate the International Liver Congress, Texas researchers today reported more success with sofosbuvir and daclatasvir.
The use of interferon to treat hepatitis C infections has fallen out of favor with the advent of new antivirals and drug combinations that have fewer side effects. But in a study presented at the 2015 International Liver Congress in Vienna, Austria, researchers from the UK said that physicians should put interferon back on the treatment menu.
In this video interview, Camille Barrault, MD, spoke about the implications her work with baclofen could have for the future of liver disease research at The International Liver Congress 2015, Vienna, Austria.
When it comes to developing heart disease, patients who have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) liver disease are at greater risk of both cardiovascular illness and death than patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease a UK team reported today at the International Liver Congress in Vienna, Austria.
$vAR$