HCPLive

Any Amount of Smoking Increases Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Women

 
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12 (HealthDay News) -- For women without coronary heart disease (CHD) at baseline, smoking, even in small quantities, is associated with a significantly increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to research published online Dec. 11 in Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

Roopinder K. Sandhu, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and colleagues prospectively examined the correlation between cigarette smoking and smoking cessation on the risk of SCD among 101,018 women from the Nurses' Health Study without CHD, stroke, or cancer at baseline in 1980.

During 30 years of follow-up, the researchers identified 351 SCD events. After controlling for coronary risk factors, current smokers had a significant 2.44-fold increased risk of SCD compared with never smokers. Among current smokers, the quantity of cigarettes smoked daily and smoking duration were significantly linearly linked to SCD risk in multivariate analysis. The risk of SCD was significantly increased even with small-to-moderate amounts of cigarette consumption (one to 14 per day; 1.84-fold increased risk) and with every five years of continued smoking (hazard ratio, 1.08). After quitting, there was a linear decrease in the risk of SCD over time, and after 20 years of cessation, the risk was equivalent to that of a never smoker.

"A dose-dependent relationship between smoking and SCD was observed, and even small-to-moderate quantities of daily smoking were associated with SCD risk," the authors write. "Efforts to prevent SCD among women should consider aggressive strategies for smoking cessation among all women."
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

 
Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

The fittest seniors are half as likely as others to suffer from heart failure, according to research published in the July 1 issue of JACC: Heart Failure.

Increased numbers of small cancers and precancerous lesions are found in geographical areas where more mammograms take place; however, the higher screening rates are not associated with reduced breast cancer mortality, according to a study published online July 6 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

For many cancers, mortality rates are declining and are expected to meet Healthy People 2020 (HP2020) targets, according to a study published online July 2 in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

Telemedicine monitoring is not associated with any significant difference in amputation or healing, but may be linked to increased mortality for patients with diabetic foot ulcers, according to a study published online June 26 in Diabetes Care.

$vAR$