HCPLive

Appropriate Use Criteria Established for Amyloid PET

 
TUESDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Experts have agreed upon appropriate use criteria for positron emission tomography (PET) of brain amyloid β, according to a report published online Jan. 28 in Alzheimer's & Dementia.

Keith A. Johnson, M.D., from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues, together with the Alzheimer's Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, convened the Amyloid Imaging Task Force to provide guidance to dementia care practitioners, patients, and caregivers. Peer-reviewed, published literature was reviewed to develop a consensus opinion about the use of amyloid PET in specific clinical scenarios.

The researchers developed and agreed upon a series of specific appropriate use criteria to define the patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used. Amyloid imaging is appropriate when the following criteria are met: there is evidence of a cognitive complaint with objectively confirmed impairment; when Alzheimer's disease is a possible diagnosis, but that diagnosis is uncertain after a comprehensive evaluation by an expert; and when knowledge of amyloid pathology is likely to increase diagnostic certainty and alter management.

"Because both dementia care and amyloid PET technology are in active development, these appropriate use criteria will require periodic reassessment," the authors write. "Future research directions are also outlined, including diagnostic utility and patient-centered outcomes."

Multiple Task Force members and reviewers disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical and other health care companies.
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

The US Food and Drug Administration approved a new use for sirolimus, treating a rare lung disease.
Untreated strep infections can cause acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in children. That complication has become rare in the continental US, but a new CDC report finds a resurgence in the American territory of Samoa and in people of Samoan descent living in the state of Hawaii.
In this segment of the Peer Exchange, the panelists discuss patients’ misconceptions of the risks associated with use of anticoagulants, and the risks and benefits of using triple therapy with antiplatelets, antithrombotics, and the newer drugs.
Plasma-rich platelet injection, an arthritis therapy, is thought to induce regeneration of damaged cartilage. A Netherlands team looked at existing studies and was not convinced that there is credible proof the therapy works. The studies all had a high-to-moderate risk of bias, they found.
$vAR$