HCPLive

Displaying Exercise Needed to Burn Food Calories Effective in Youth

FRIDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Displaying the amount of exercise needed to burn off the calories of menu items may lead to lower-calorie food choices in young people, according to a study presented at Experimental Biology 2013, held from April 20 to 24 in Boston.

Ashlei James, from Texas Christian University, in Fort Worth, and colleagues randomly assigned 300 men and women (aged 18 to 30 years) to a menu without calorie labels (NCL; 99 participants), a menu with calorie labels (CL; 99), or a menu with labels on the minutes of brisk walking needed to burn the food calories (EL; 102). The same food/beverage options were listed on all menus.

The researchers observed a significant menu effect on both calories ordered and consumed. In the EL group compared to NCL group there were significantly fewer calories ordered (adjusted mean, 763 versus 902 kcal) and consumed (adjusted mean, 673 versus 770 kcal). The CL and the NCL groups did not differ significantly in the food calories ordered or consumed. Similarly, there was no difference between the CL and the EL groups. Post-lunch calorie intake did not differ by menu condition.

"This study suggests there are benefits to displaying exercise minutes to a group of young men and women. We can't generalize to a population over age 30, so we will further investigate this in an older and more diverse group," a coauthor said in a statement. "This is the first study to look at the effects of displaying minutes of brisk walking needed to burn food calories on the calories ordered and consumed."

Press Release
More Information

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

With the increasing number of patients turning to epidural steroid injections for pain relief, specialists with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Safe Use Initiative gathered specialists to improve the procedure.
To prescribe or not to prescribe? – That is the question that practitioners face regarding antibiotics. While they can be extremely beneficial, the medication proved to be the deadly approach for one patient.
For patients with Alzheimer's Disease, as their condition worsens it often falls on other members of their family to make decisions about their course of treatment. What they are expected to do and how they make certain decisions can have long lasting impacts on the care of the people with the disease.
One of the main focus points in the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease is screening patients before they even show symptoms of the condition. This is a part of the process that also includes looking to develop new treatments that could be used in the future.
$vAR$