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Drinking Wine May Have Many Positive Effects for Your Skin

A recent study out of Spain has found that wine may help protect skin from sunburn, sun-related aging, and even skin cancer caused by exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays.  The University of Barcelona and the Spanish National Research Council looked at the chemical reaction in the skin when hit by UV rays from the sun and found specific substances that help the skin.
 
Flavonoids found in grapes protect cells from the sun by stopping the chemical reaction that causes cells to die when rays hit skin and cause skin damage.  The results of the study could be used to develop skin creams and lotions geared toward protecting the skin from sun damage.  Cosmetic companies have already expressed interest in the prospects of making these creams or pills that copy the process.
 
Marta Cascante, a biochemist at the University of Barcelona and the director of the research project, stated that this new data proves that grapes can protect the skin from sunburn and even skin cancer. “This study supports the idea of using these products to protect the skin from cell damage and death caused by solar radiation, as well as increasing our understanding of the mechanism by which they act.”
 
Around the Web
 
Drinking wine could help to stop sunburn [The Telegraph]
 
Study Shows that Wine May Help Prevent Sunburns [Delish.com] 
 
So long, sunscreen? Scientists suggest red wine helps prevent sunburn [CBS News]

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