HCPLive

Dual Epidural Analgesia Most Effective for Scoliosis Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Dual continuous epidural analgesia (CEA) is the most effective pain control method following surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

Joshua W.B. Klatt, MD, from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, and colleagues randomized 66 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis to patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), single CEA, or double CEA. Analyzed data included postoperative pain scores, side effects, complications, and use of breakthrough medication. Recovery times were assessed by several measurements, including hospitalization, times to first bowel movement, and days to walk and climb stairs.

The researchers found that double CEA most effectively controlled pain intensity, compared to PCA and a single CEA. PCA and single CEA groups similarly controlled pain. Single CEA had the fewest side effects, with an average of 2.55 side effects per patient. Pruritis, constipation, and nausea constituted the majority of side effects. No late onset neurological events were seen in any patients.

"On the basis [of] these findings, we now routinely use the double CEA technique for all patients having surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis," Klatt and colleagues conclude.

Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

Generally, surgeons are gravitating toward shorter courses of antibiotics for surgical prophylaxis to reduce toxicity, selection of resistant organisms, Clostridium difficile infection, and cost.
Most oncologists recommend removing melanomas within 4 to 6 weeks of diagnostic biopsy. Researchers have analyzed Medicare’s database to determine how quickly the highest risk population (elderly people) have melanomas removed. Their findings indicate 20 percent wait more than 1.5 months to have the malignancy removed, and roughly 8 percent wait longer than 3 months.
Multiple sclerosis, especially in the relapsing form poses a variety of challenges for patient care. Keeping that in mind, the development of medications for the condition also take time to progress.
Ibuprofen and acetaminophen are among the well-known ingredients found in pain relievers, but an unusual addition that works just as well as existing medications may be making its way onto store shelves.
$vAR$