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Flu Vaccine Up Among Medical Staff When They Believe It Works

Monday, March 12 (HealthDay News) -- Josien Riphagen-Dalhuisen, M.D., of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of the literature and identified 13 studies with data to assist in determining predictors of seasonal influenza vaccination in hospital HCWs.

The researchers found that hospital HCWs were at least twice as likely to receive the seasonal influenza vaccination if they knew the vaccine to be effective, were willing to prevent influenza transmission, believed that influenza is highly contagious and that prevention is important, and had a family that typically is vaccinated.

"We therefore recommend targeting these predictors when developing new influenza vaccination implementation strategies for hospital HCWs," the authors write.

Abstract
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Hospital health care workers are more likely to receive the seasonal influenza vaccination if they believe it works and are committed to preventing this highly contagious virus, according to research published in the April issue of Occupational & Environmental Medicine.


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