HCPLive

Related Tags

Higher Red Meat Consumption Linked to Risk of Death

Wednesday, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- An Pan, Ph.D., of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues prospectively observed 37,698 men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986 to 2008) and 83,644 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1980 to 2008) who were free of CVD and cancer at baseline. Validated food frequency questionnaires were used to assess diet and were updated every four years.

The researchers found that, during the 2.96 million person-years of follow-up, there were 23,926 deaths (including 5,910 CVD and 9,464 cancer deaths). The pooled hazard ratio (HR) of total mortality for a one-serving per-day increase was 1.13 for unprocessed red meat and 1.20 for processed red meat, after multivariable adjustment for major lifestyle and dietary risk factors. The HRs for CVD mortality were 1.18 for unprocessed and 1.21 for processed meats, and 1.10 and 1.16, respectively, for cancer mortality. The researchers estimated that substitutions of one serving per day of red meat with one serving per day of other foods (including fish, poultry, nuts, legumes, low-fat dairy, and whole grains) were associated with a 7 to 19 percent decreased mortality risk. If individuals consumed fewer than 0.5 servings of red meat per day (approximately 42 grams/day), an estimated 9.3 percent of deaths in men and 7.6 percent of deaths in women in these cohorts could be prevented.

"Red meat consumption is associated with an increased risk of total, CVD, and cancer mortality," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Eating more red meat appears to be associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality and death from cardiovascular disease and cancer specifically, according to research published online March 12 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.


Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

When it comes to developing heart disease, patients who have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) liver disease are at greater risk of both cardiovascular illness and death than patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease a UK team reported today at the International Liver Congress in Vienna, Austria.
Rheumatoid arthritis patients have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but tofacitinib can reduce these issues, according to research published in Arthritis & Rheumatology.
Although physical activity is important for health, a healthy diet is essential for weight loss -- and regular exercise will not make up for a poor diet, according to an editorial published online April 22 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
Canada- and Switzerland-based researchers discovered that a specific gene, that is typically associated with a rare disease, plays an important role in how pain is processed in the body.
$vAR$