HCPLive

Infants Comprehend Some Words As Early As 6 Months

Infants already know the meanings of several common words at 6 months of age, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Elika Bergelson and Daniel Swingley, Ph.D., from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, presented 6- to 9-month old infants with sets of pictures to view while their parent named a picture in each set.

The researchers found that, over the entire age range, infants directed their gaze to the named pictures, indicating their understanding of spoken words. According to the investigators, because the study involved no word training in the laboratory, the results show that even young infants learn ordinary words through daily experience with language.

"The precocious discovery of word meanings suggests a perspective in which learning vocabulary and learning the sound structure of spoken language go hand in hand as language acquisition begins," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

In a study approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, California researchers are launching a pilot program to see if MDMA, the recreational drug known as “Ecstasy” will alleviate social anxiety in adults with autism.
Patients with gout may find relief from severe inflammatory pain due to recently explored peripheral system channels.
As more is learned about the gut microbiome researchers are finding new ways to apply it to other fields of medicine. A recent study looked at how it can affect multiple sclerosis and what role it can have in future treatment options.
Celecoxib seems safe and effective for treatment of depression due to acute brucellosis, according to a study published online May 26 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics.

$vAR$