HCPLive

Metformin Cuts Cardiovascular Events in High-Risk Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

 
MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Metformin therapy significantly reduces cardiovascular events in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes compared to treatment with glipizide, according to a study published online Dec. 10 in Diabetes Care.

Jie Hong, M.D., from the Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, and colleagues conducted a multicenter trial in which 304 patients with type 2 diabetes with coronary artery disease (mean age, 63.3 years) were randomized to receive glipizide (30 mg daily) or metformin (1.5 g daily) for three years. The composite end point was times to recurrent cardiovascular events, including death from a cardiovascular cause, death from any cause, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or arterial revascularization.

The researchers found that both groups achieved a significant reduction in the level of glycated hemoglobin (7.1 percent in the glipizide group and 7.0 percent in the metformin group). Ninety-one participants developed 103 primary end points over a median follow-up of five years. The adjusted hazard ratio for the composites of cardiovascular events among the patients that received metformin versus glipizide was 0.54. There was no significant difference between the two groups for secondary end points and adverse events.

"Treatment with metformin for three years substantially reduced major cardiovascular events in a median follow-up of 5.0 years compared with glipizide," the authors write.

The glipizide and metformin were provided by the Xinyi Pharmaceutical Co.
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

 
Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

Untreated strep infections can cause acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in children. That complication has become rare in the continental US, but a new CDC report finds a resurgence in the American territory of Samoa and in people of Samoan descent living in the state of Hawaii.
In this segment of the Peer Exchange, the panelists discuss patients’ misconceptions of the risks associated with use of anticoagulants, and the risks and benefits of using triple therapy with antiplatelets, antithrombotics, and the newer drugs.
Plasma-rich platelet injection, an arthritis therapy, is thought to induce regeneration of damaged cartilage. A Netherlands team looked at existing studies and was not convinced that there is credible proof the therapy works. The studies all had a high-to-moderate risk of bias, they found.
Chronic painful conditions can have a significant negative impact on a patient’s quality of life, but are some conditions worse than others? A recent study sought to determine which chronic pain condition creates the biggest burden on patient quality of life.
$vAR$