HCPLive

More Than Two Million People Have Signed Up for ACA Coverage

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 2.2 million Americans had selected health plans through the federal and state marketplaces as of late December, and nearly one in four was a young adult, the Obama administration disclosed Monday.

"The numbers show that there is a very strong national demand for affordable health care made possible by the Affordable Care Act," Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said during a news conference Monday afternoon. "More than six million Americans have now either signed up for private health insurance plans or for Medicaid coverage through the marketplace," she said.

Twenty-four percent of people who chose a plan were in the key 18-to-34-year-old demographic. Attracting enough young adults to the mix should keep health insurance rates more affordable, experts say. Young people tend to be healthier, helping to offset the risk of covering older, sicker adults. "For the 18-34 age band, we would want at least 32 percent of the adult sign-ups [people ages 18 to 64] to be in that category," David Axene, president and consulting actuary at Axene Health Partners, of Murrieta, Calif. told HealthDay. "Materially less than that leads to subsidy concerns," he added.

Sebelius highlighted a rosier statistic during Monday's news conference, noting that 30 percent of enrollees were under age 35. But that figure includes people 17 and younger who are not yet considered adults.

Full Article


Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

The US Food and Drug Administration approved a new use for sirolimus, treating a rare lung disease.
Untreated strep infections can cause acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in children. That complication has become rare in the continental US, but a new CDC report finds a resurgence in the American territory of Samoa and in people of Samoan descent living in the state of Hawaii.
In this segment of the Peer Exchange, the panelists discuss patients’ misconceptions of the risks associated with use of anticoagulants, and the risks and benefits of using triple therapy with antiplatelets, antithrombotics, and the newer drugs.
Plasma-rich platelet injection, an arthritis therapy, is thought to induce regeneration of damaged cartilage. A Netherlands team looked at existing studies and was not convinced that there is credible proof the therapy works. The studies all had a high-to-moderate risk of bias, they found.
$vacMongoViewPlus$ $vAR$