HCPLive

Music Beneficial for Children Undergoing IV Placement

THURSDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- For children undergoing intravenous placement, music seems to have a favorable effect, with benefits also reported by parents and health care providers, according to a study published online July 15 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Lisa Hartling, PhD, from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and colleagues conducted a randomized clinical trial in a pediatric emergency department to compare music with standard care for managing pain and distress. Participants included 42 children aged 3 to 11 years undergoing intravenous placement.

The researchers found that there was no significant difference in the change in behavioral distress before the procedure to immediately after the procedure, with and without controlling for potential confounders. On exclusion of children who experienced no distress during the procedure, the increase in distress was significantly less in the music group. Children in the standard-care group experienced a two-point increase in pain scores, while scores remained the same for children in the music group (P = 0.04; clinically important difference). Parents' satisfaction with the management of pain favored the music group (P = 0.07). According to health care providers, procedure performance was easier for children in the music versus the standard-care group (76 versus 38 percent "very easy"). Health care provider satisfaction with intravenous placement was higher for the music versus the standard-care group (86 versus 48 percent "very satisfied").

"Music may have a positive impact on pain and distress for children undergoing intravenous placement," the authors write. "Benefits were also observed for the parents and health care providers."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

The assumption used to be that after a liver transplant patients would need to take immunnosuppressive drugs for years, even for life. A team of German researchers say that for about half of their adult patients, that is no longer true.
As good news about new treatments for hepatitis C infections continues to dominate the International Liver Congress, Texas researchers today reported more success with sofosbuvir and daclatasvir.
One cure for polycystic liver disease is a liver transplant—but since the disease is not fatal (the liver continues to do its job despite the problems the condition causes for patients), physicians face a treatment dilemma. A Belgian team offers an objective way to make the decision.
Video Interview: Vinood Patel, PhD, PGCHE, fHEA, FRSC, University of Westminster, London, UK, shared valuable insight regarding chronic alcoholic demographics and biomarkers on the horizon at The International Liver Congress 2015.
$vAR$