HCPLive

Related Tags

'Optimal Time for Delivery' Redefined

THURSDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- The number of fetal deaths that could be avoided by delivery is greater than the number of neonatal deaths that would be anticipated by delivery around 37 to 38 weeks' gestation, according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Using data from the National Center for Health Statistics, Alicia Mandujano, MD, of the MetroHealth Medical Center/Case Western Reserve University, in Cleveland, and colleagues examined the optimal gestational age for delivery by comparing the risk of death for those fetuses remaining undelivered with the rate of neonatal death for each week of gestation.

According to the researchers, the risk of fetal death declined between 34 and 40 weeks' gestation, but then increased at term. The fetal death risk of those remaining undelivered was higher for high-risk pregnancies than for low-risk pregnancies. By 37 to 38 weeks' gestation, the number of fetal deaths exceeded the number of neonatal deaths.

"The data reported herein suggest that the 'optimal time for delivery' is not necessarily the same for everyone, and, as is often the case in the practice of medicine, providers should individualize their approach for each patient," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

Many breast cancer patients who are eligible for breast-conserving surgery still choose to have the entire breast removed, according to research scheduled for presentation Thursday at the annual meeting of the American Surgical Association, held from April 23 to 25 in San Diego.
Although physical activity is important for health, a healthy diet is essential for weight loss -- and regular exercise will not make up for a poor diet, according to an editorial published online April 22 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
At five years after surgery, women undergoing subtotal abdominal hysterectomy were more likely to have urinary incontinence than those undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy, according to a study published in the May issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
Oophorectomy is associated with a decrease in mortality in women with breast cancer and a BRCA1 mutation, and women with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer and a BRCA1 mutation should undergo the procedure shortly after diagnosis, according to research published online April 23 in JAMA Oncology.
$vAR$