HCPLive

Cadaveric Growth Hormone Does Not Appear to Transmit Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s Disease

 
cadaveric growth hormone does not transmit Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's diseaseTUESDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- There seems to be no evidence to support human-to-human transmission of Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) via transmission of neurodegenerative disease (ND)-associated proteins (NDAPs) in recipients of cadaveric human growth hormone (c-hGH), according to a study published online Feb. 4 in JAMA Neurology.

Noting the growing evidence of cell-to-cell transmission of NDAPs, David J. Irwin, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia, and colleagues examined evidence for human-to-human transmission of AD, PD, and related NDAPs in 34 routine autopsy subjects (10 non-ND controls and 24 patients with ND) and among recipients of c-hGH in the U.S. National Hormone and Pituitary Program (NHPP) cohort.

In ND and control patients, the researchers identified mild amounts of pathological tau, amyloid-β, and α-synuclein deposits in the adeno/neurohypophysis. Among U.S. NHPP c-hGH recipients, there were no cases of AD or PD; three deaths were attributed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

"In this unique in vivo model of human-to-human transmission, we found no evidence to support concerns that NDAPs underlying AD and PD transmit disease in humans despite evidence of their cell-to-cell transmission in model systems of these disorders," the authors write. "Further monitoring is required to confirm these conclusions."

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.
 

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

While abnormal eating behaviors are recognized in behavioral frontotemportal dementia (bvFTD) patients, not much has been reported has been found on the effects on their metabolic health until recently, according to lead author Rebekah Ahmed, MD. The study is due to be presented in a poster session on Apr. 20 at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in Washington, DC.
Age and the level of the brain’s executive capacity (EC) are connected to the attention that adults give to novel auditory stimuli, according to Kirk Daffner, MD, chief of the division of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology and director of the Center for Brain/Mind Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA. The findings are set to be presented in a poster session on Apr. 20 at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in Washington, DC.
As healthy adults age their motor response inhibition may become impaired, according to Ali Shoraka, MD, a Researcher Coordinator at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL. The study is due to be presented in a poster session on Apr. 20 at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in Washington, DC.
Diagnosing Anti-N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody encephalitis in adults differs from doing so in young children. Gait disturbance is a reliable sign, a Johns Hopkins team reports.
$vAR$