HCPLive

Case Study Identifies B. miyamotoi As Cause of Meningoencephalitis

 
THURSDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The spirochete, Borrelia miyamotoi, may be an underrecognized cause of meningoencephalitis, according to a case study published in the Jan. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Joseph L. Gugliotta, M.D., of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, N.J., and colleagues report the case of a B. miyamotoi infection-associated meningoencephalitis which developed in an immunocompromised patient.

According to the report, an 80-year-old woman who lived on a farm in New Jersey, who had been treated twice for Lyme Disease and was immunocompromised due to treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, developed progressive cognitive decline over a four-month period. She was admitted to the hospital and diagnosed with meningoencephalitis. Although Koch's postulates were not met, the woman's illness was posited to be caused by infection with the spirochete B. miyamotoi as the organism was directly detected in cerebrospinal fluid using both microscopy and polymerase chain reaction assay. Following treatment with antibiotics, the patient's physical and mental conditions improved.

"In older persons, changes in mental status are often attributed to dementia or the aging process. Exposure of such persons to diverse microbial agents, including those thought to be nonpathogenic, such as B. miyamotoi, may represent possibilities for pathologic processes to occur," the authors write. "Immunocompromise in older patients should always prompt a more rigorous laboratory analysis, because such persons may serve as sentinels for poorly recognized or novel pathogens."
 

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Letter to the Editor


Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

Teens who have trouble coping with stress may face an increased risk for future coronary heart disease that even exercise can't erase, a new study suggests. The report was published online March 4 in Heart.
Patients with atrial fibrillation who take digoxin may face a nearly 30 percent greater risk of death than patients not taking the drug, a review of prior research suggests. The findings are to be presented March 15 at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 14 to 16 in San Diego.]
People who are fit in their 40s seem to retain more brain volume two decades later and also perform better on decision-making tests, new research suggests. The findings were presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2015 Scientific Sessions, held from March 3 to 6 in Baltimore.
Closely following the Mediterranean diet can significantly lower risk of heart disease, another study suggests. The findings are to be presented March 15 at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, held from March 14 to 16 in San Diego.
$vAR$