HCPLive

Diabetes Not Correlated with Adverse Outcomes After Knee Replacement

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, diabetes (with or without poor glycemic control) is not associated with adverse surgical outcomes, according to research published online Feb. 27 in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

In an effort to examine the correlation between diabetes status and preoperative glycemic control with surgical outcomes, Annette L. Adams, PhD, MPH, from Kaiser Permanente Southern California in Pasadena, and colleagues conducted a retrospective review of 40,491 patients who underwent elective first primary total knee arthroplasty.

The researchers found that 18.7 percent of the patients had diabetes, 1.1 percent underwent revision arthroplasty, and 0.7 percent developed a deep infection. Compared with patients without diabetes, there was no significant correlation between controlled or uncontrolled diabetes with the risk of revision, deep infection, or deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

"No significantly increased risk of revision arthroplasty, deep infection, or deep venous thrombosis was found in patients with diabetes (as defined on the basis of preoperative hemoglobin A1c levels and other criteria) compared with patients without diabetes in the study population of patients who underwent elective total knee arthroplasty," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to an entity in the biomedical arena.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

The US had been found to have a higher percentage of opioid use than in any other country.
While children with HIV may have low levels of a key immune cell, a new study shows that most will recover the cell with proper treatment.
Patients administered minimally invasive surgery (MIS) colon resection procedures instead of open surgery leave the hospital quicker and require less follow up with physicians and fewer medical prescriptions.
Researchers will no longer have to test Ebola virus vaccines using the virus strain from the 1976 Zaire outbreak because the results from phase 1 of a new trial are in.
$vAR$