HCPLive

Dual Epidural Analgesia Most Effective for Scoliosis Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Dual continuous epidural analgesia (CEA) is the most effective pain control method following surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

Joshua W.B. Klatt, MD, from the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, and colleagues randomized 66 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis to patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), single CEA, or double CEA. Analyzed data included postoperative pain scores, side effects, complications, and use of breakthrough medication. Recovery times were assessed by several measurements, including hospitalization, times to first bowel movement, and days to walk and climb stairs.

The researchers found that double CEA most effectively controlled pain intensity, compared to PCA and a single CEA. PCA and single CEA groups similarly controlled pain. Single CEA had the fewest side effects, with an average of 2.55 side effects per patient. Pruritis, constipation, and nausea constituted the majority of side effects. No late onset neurological events were seen in any patients.

"On the basis [of] these findings, we now routinely use the double CEA technique for all patients having surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis," Klatt and colleagues conclude.

Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

Being Greek does not necessarily mean eating healthy. A new study showed that adults in Greece who ate a traditional Mediterranean style diet—one that stresses eating fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, fish, olive oil and moderate consumption of red wine—were 47% less likely to develop heart disease than peers who were eating Western-style. A related study, however, showed that physicians often do not know enough about the diet to counsel patients.
It’s no secret that behavior can alter a person’s likelihood of developing heart failure. In a new set of metrics, Faraz Ahmad, MD and colleagues at Northwestern University offer physicians a tool to show how many healthy heart-failure free years patients can gain by avoiding risky behaviors.
A team of investigators from the University of California (UC) Davis has discovered a compound that can potentially combat chronic pain by blocking key chemicals.
Doctors treating patients with osteoarthritis may need to look no higher than their ceilings to see the inspiration behind the newest diagnostic tool.
$vAR$