HCPLive

Inpatient Deaths Fell 8 Percent in Last Decade

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- The number of inpatient hospital deaths declined by 8 percent over the last decade, although the total number of hospitalizations increased by 11 percent during the same period, according to a March data brief issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Margaret Jean Hall, PhD, from the NCHS, in Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues analyzed data on hospital deaths from 2000 to 2010 using the National Hospital Discharge Survey.

The researchers found that, although the number of inpatient hospital deaths fell by 8 percent from 2000 to 2010 (from 776,000 to 715,000), the number of total hospitalizations increased by 11 percent. A quarter of inpatient deaths were for patients 85 years and older. Hospital death rates fell for most causes but increased by 17 percent for septicemia. In 2010, patients who died in the hospital stayed an average of 7.9 days, while the average stay for all patients was only 4.8 days.

"The number of patients who died in the hospital in the years 2000 to 2010 decreased, as did the rate of hospitalizations ending in death, but there were still over 700,000 patients who died in the hospital in 2010," Hall and colleagues conclude.

Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

Making the transition from transfemoral to transradial access may provide longterm benefits for acute coronary syndrome patients, but changing years of training to the newer method also figures to be a longterm project for the cardiac community.
For patients with acute coronary syndrome there has been one longstanding treatment method which doctors have used for many years. In recent years interventional cardiologists have been looking at whether a fresh approach might be best for this patient group.
What is currently considered to be the “gold standard” for post-shoulder surgery pain management may not be as effective as what once was believed.
Though current cell phones are not up to par, soon, mobile devices like smart phones can serve as cardiac monitors, according to a clinical review published in JAMA Internal Medicine.
$vAR$