HCPLive

Low Rates of High Platelet Reactivity with Prasugrel Treatment

 
MONDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with percutaneous coronary intervention and a maintenance dose of prasugrel is associated with low rates of high platelet reactivity (HPR), ischemic events, and major bleeding in the first 30 days of treatment, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Guillaume Cayla, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Paris, and colleagues studied the platelet reactivity and rate of 30-day bleeding events in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention and prasugrel 10 mg/day after ACS. Platelet reactivity was monitored using three different tests: the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) index, the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, and light transmission aggregometry.

The researchers found that HPR was seen in 6.8, 3.4, and 3.2 percent of patients using the VASP, P2Y12, and residual platelet reactivity definitions, respectively. Obesity and multivessel disease were significantly and independently associated with HPR. No major bleeding complications were observed at 30 days, and 1.6 percent of patients had recurrent ischemic events. Overall, 14.2 percent of patients experienced nuisance bleeding and 2.5 percent experienced minor bleeding episodes, neither of which were predicted by VASP index.

"In conclusion, patients with acute coronary syndromes receiving maintenance doses of prasugrel have low rates of HPR and ischemic events within the first month. Minor or minimal bleeding is frequent, but not major bleeding," the authors write. "VASP was poorly correlated with the risk for minor or minimal bleeding."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.
 

Abstract
Full Text

 
Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

People with more exposure to air pollution are more likely to have carotid artery stenosis, researchers from NYU School of Medicine’s Center for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease have found.
Being Greek does not necessarily mean eating healthy. A new study showed that adults in Greece who ate a traditional Mediterranean style diet—one that stresses eating fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, fish, olive oil and moderate consumption of red wine—were 47% less likely to develop heart disease than peers who were eating Western-style. A related study, however, showed that physicians often do not know enough about the diet to counsel patients.
It’s no secret that behavior can alter a person’s likelihood of developing heart failure. In a new set of metrics, Faraz Ahmad, MD and colleagues at Northwestern University offer physicians a tool to show how many healthy heart-failure free years patients can gain by avoiding risky behaviors.
A team of investigators from the University of California (UC) Davis has discovered a compound that can potentially combat chronic pain by blocking key chemicals.
$vAR$