HCPLive

Poor Sleep Connected to Obesity, Diabetes, and Heart Disease

Poor Sleep Connected to Obesity, Diabetes, and Heart DiseasePoor sleep is connected to a significantly increased risk for major cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, such as obesity, diabetes, and coronary artery disease, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine have found.

The researchers studied data on 138,201 individuals from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, an annual telephone survey carried out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. After adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, medical, and psychological factors, they found that patients who suffered sleep disturbances at least three nights per week were 35% more likely to be obese, 54% more likely to have diabetes, 98% more likely to have coronary artery disease, 80% more likely to suffer a heart attack, and 102% more likely to have a stroke.

“Previous studies have demonstrated that those who get less sleep are more likely to also be obese, have diabetes or cardiovascular disease, and are more likely to die sooner, but this new analysis has revealed that other sleep problems, such as difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or even too much sleep, are also associated with cardiovascular and metabolic health issues,” the study’s lead author, Michael A. Grandner, PhD, said in a press release.

The researchers added that future studies should focus on whether sleep intervention has the potential to reduce the cardiometabolic consequences of sleep disturbance.

The study was published online ahead of print last month in the Journal of Sleep Research.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

The American Heart Association was one of the first organizations to advocate dietary changes to decrease the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The organization's first recommendation appeared in 1957 advising a decrease in the amount of fat intake to decrease atherosclerosis risk. Today, a different approach is recommended, which considers the diet as a whole, with recommendations of what to both include and avoid. Among other nutritional and lifestyle recommendations, the AHA advises the consumption of 2 servings of fish weekly for both men and women.
Obstructive peripheral artery disease (PAD) manifests itself with intermittent claudication (affecting 20 to 40 million individuals worldwide), which is described as exertional lower extremity pains, and in more advanced stages with critical limb ischemia and acute or chronic limb ischemia. Irrespective of presentation, patients with PAD are at increased risk for adverse cardiovascular (CV) events. Therefore, risk factor modification is the cornerstone of the management of PAD.
Studies have identified lower-than-normal BMIs to be associated with higher mortality in comparison with normal body weight and overweight individuals in patients with coronary artery disease. This has given rise to the term "obesity paradox" in which being overweight/obese confers a survival advantage in individuals that have been diagnosed with a medical condition. Against this backdrop, this study attempted to evaluate whether there is an association between BMI and death risk among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
It is well established that among patients with the clinical syndrome of heart failure, approximately half have preserved systolic function, known commonly as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although originally considered to be a syndrome that pathophysiologically involves diastolic dysfunction, ongoing investigation suggests that although diastolic abnormalities may be present in many patients, other aspects of pathophysiology likely also contribute to symptoms. This study examined the association of beta-blockers with mortality in patients with HFpEF.
$vAR$