HCPLive

SRS: Bracing Effective for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

 
THURSDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, bracing correlates with decreased progression of high-risk curves, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the Scoliosis Research Society, held from Sept. 18 to 21 in Lyon, France.

Stuart L. Weinstein, M.D., from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and colleagues conducted a multicenter study involving 242 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis to examine the effects of bracing. One hundred sixteen patients were randomized to bracing or observation and 126 chose between bracing and observation. Participants in the bracing groups were told to wear a brace for 18 hours per day or more.

Due to the efficacy of bracing, the trial was stopped early. The researchers found that the rate of treatment success (skeletal maturity without curve progression of 50 degrees or more) was 72 percent after bracing compared with 48 percent after observation (propensity-score-adjusted odds ratio, 1.93) in an analysis including both the randomized and preference cohorts. The rate of success was 75 percent among patients randomized to bracing, compared with 42 percent for those randomized to observation (odds ratio, 4.11) in intention-to-treat analysis. Longer hours of brace wear correlated significantly with higher rates of treatment success.

"Bracing significantly decreased the progression of high-risk curves to the threshold for surgery in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis," the authors write. "The benefit increased with longer hours of brace wear."

Abstract 

Full Text
More Information

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 
 

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

The US had been found to have a higher percentage of opioid use than in any other country.
While children with HIV may have low levels of a key immune cell, a new study shows that most will recover the cell with proper treatment.
Although the relationship between pain and spatial representation is unclear, a study published in Current Biology took steps in understanding how pain is activated in the brain and raised the possibility of reducing the sensation.
Patients administered minimally invasive surgery (MIS) colon resection procedures instead of open surgery leave the hospital quicker and require less follow up with physicians and fewer medical prescriptions.
$vAR$