HCPLive

Soccer Heading Linked to Brain Abnormalities, Cognition

TUESDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated soccer heading is tied to subconcussive brain injury and poorer memory functioning, with evidence of a threshold dose-response relationship, according to a study published online June 11 in Radiology.

Michael L. Lipton, MD, PhD, from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in Bronx, NY, and colleagues surveyed 37 amateur soccer players (mean age, 30.9 years; 75 percent men) regarding frequency of heading in the prior 12 months and lifetime concussions. Diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T was performed. A computerized battery of tests was used to assess cognitive function.

The researchers found that participants had headed a median of 432 times over the previous year. Lower fractional anisotropy (FA) at three locations in temporo-occipital white matter was associated with heading. The heading threshold varied according to location (885 to 1,550 headings per year; P < 0.00001). There was also a significant association between lower levels of FA and poorer memory scores, with a threshold of 1,800 headings per year. There were no significant associations with lifetime concussion history and demographic features with either FA or cognitive performance.

"Heading is associated with abnormal white matter microstructure and with poorer neurocognitive performance," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

Children who develop progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis Type II (PFIC-II) may get better—at least for a while—without getting a liver transplant. But children borne with the condition do not, a team from Belgium found. Bile salt export pump plays a key role.
While abnormal eating behaviors are recognized in behavioral frontotemportal dementia (bvFTD) patients, not much has been reported has been found on the effects on their metabolic health until recently, according to lead author Rebekah Ahmed, MD. The study is due to be presented in a poster session on Apr. 20 at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in Washington, DC.
Age and the level of the brain’s executive capacity (EC) are connected to the attention that adults give to novel auditory stimuli, according to Kirk Daffner, MD, chief of the division of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology and director of the Center for Brain/Mind Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA. The findings are set to be presented in a poster session on Apr. 20 at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in Washington, DC.
As healthy adults age their motor response inhibition may become impaired, according to Ali Shoraka, MD, a Researcher Coordinator at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL. The study is due to be presented in a poster session on Apr. 20 at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in Washington, DC.
$vAR$