HCPLive

Younger Women Should Be Screened for Partner Violence

 
MONDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Women of childbearing age should be screened for intimate partner violence (IPV) and referred for intervention services if necessary, according to recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), published online Jan. 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

To update the USPSTF 2004 recommendations, Virginia A. Moyer, M.D., M.P.H., of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and colleagues from the USPSTF conducted a systematic review on screening women for IPV, focusing on the accuracy of screening tools for identifying IPV among asymptomatic women of childbearing age, and on the benefits and harms of screening vulnerable adults for abuse and neglect.

The USPSTF gave a grade B recommendation for screening women of childbearing age for IPV, including domestic violence. Women who screen positive should be provided with or referred for intervention services. There is currently inadequate evidence to assess the benefits and harms of screening vulnerable adults (physical or mental dysfunction) or the elderly.

"The USPSTF recognizes that clinical decisions involve more considerations than evidence alone. Clinicians should understand the evidence but individualize decision making to the specific patient or situation," the authors write. "Similarly, the USPSTF notes that policy and coverage decisions involve considerations in addition to the evidence of clinical benefits and harms."
 

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.
 
 

Most Popular

Recommended Reading

The US had been found to have a higher percentage of opioid use than in any other country.
While children with HIV may have low levels of a key immune cell, a new study shows that most will recover the cell with proper treatment.
Although the relationship between pain and spatial representation is unclear, a study published in Current Biology took steps in understanding how pain is activated in the brain and raised the possibility of reducing the sensation.
Patients administered minimally invasive surgery (MIS) colon resection procedures instead of open surgery leave the hospital quicker and require less follow up with physicians and fewer medical prescriptions.
$vAR$