Mid-Year Financial Checklist


It’s now more than halfway through the year — do you know how your money is doing? Most likely, your New Year’s Resolutions have long since fallen by the wayside, but there are ways to get back on the financial wagon.
 
In the middle of the year, it might be easy to become lax with your finances. It’s summer and, typically, vacation time. Furthermore, there are no really pressing events to make you think about your finances.
 
People tend to set their budgets and goals at the beginning of the year and forget about them. And toward the end of the year, most people take a last look to see if there are any last-minute moves they can make to save on taxes.
 
H&R Block employed the knowledge of financial blogger Meg Favreau of Wise Bread to list some simple changes in case you haven’t been keeping up with your financial goals for the year.
 
Here’s her mid-year financial checklist:
 
• Check your 401(k) contributions
Make sure you’re taking full advantage of how much you can contribute.
 
• See if you can contribute more to your IRA
The maximum contribution is $5,500 in 2013.
 
• Retool your budget
Even a small change in your life could necessitate taking another look at your budget.
 
• Adopt one new frugal habit
Even if you have enough money to live on, frugality is not to be overlooked — some rich people got that way by being frugal.
 
• Set a specific goal
This will help if you start to slip up.
 
• Do a spending freeze
Eliminate all non-necessary spending if you need a financial jump-start.
 
Read more about them here.



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