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Cinnamon Challenge May Seem Harmless, but Poses Health Risks

If you took a look at what was trending on Google this morning, you'd have a seen the peculiar search query “Cinnamon Challenge.” So, what is this strange phenomenon that seems to be sweeping the Web? It’s the latest trend among adolescents and teenagers in which one person dares another to ingest an entire spoonful of the powdery spice in 60 seconds without the help of any fluids.

 
Although it may sound harmless or even funny, the truth is that it does pose a health risk to those who are foolish enough to try it. Cinnamon powder is very dry and, without the aid of water (or any beverage), could easily get caught in the throat of whoever is trying to ingest such a large amount. Not only could this cause choking, but, if the fine powder is inhaled, it can also cause temporary but severe chest pain.
 
Many participants in the cinnamon challenge have posted videos to YouTube, and the phenomenon seems to be going viral. In fact, one website, www.cinnamonchallenge.com, is completely dedicated to user-submitted videos of those accepting the dare. Fortunately, there have not been any reported deaths associated with the cinnamon challenge, but it stands to reason that, if this “challenge” continues to gain popularity, it’s only a matter of time before some kind of tragedy occurs.
 
Around the Web:

 
Urban Dictionary definition for Cinnamon Challenge

 
Cinnamon Challenge: Do Not Try This at Home

 

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