HCPLive

Dr. Edward Magaziner on Treating Chronic Pain Conditions with Botox


Edward Magaziner, MD, CEO, New Jersey Interventional Pain Society, Assistant Professor, New York Medical College, Clinical Professor, Robert Wood Johnson University Dept. of Anesthesia and PM&R, Medical Director, Center for Spine, Sports, Pain Management, and Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine, North Brunswick, NJ, details the chronic pain conditions he has successfully treated with Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA).

Aside from the drug's well-known cosmetic indications and its effectiveness in treating chronic migraine, Magaziner says Botox can be helpful in treating patients with chronic spasms and chronic nerve pain. For the latter group, Magaziner notes clinical studies have shown Botox injected in a grid-like fashion over the vicinity of a painful nerve decreases "some of the central sensitization that can occur after chronic nerve conditions." For chronic spasms, pain management physicians can inject Botox in the motor end-plate of a patient's muscle fiber to relieve spasticity caused by stroke or spinal cord injury, or to relax neck muscles and stop spasms in torticollis, Magaziner says.

"For people that have just some terrible spasms  who are not getting better through the use of physical therapy, massage, acupuncture, or some of the other techniques we use — when I have a last resort situation, I can always refer to Botox," Magaziner says.


Most Popular

Recommended Reading

The saying “it’s all in your head” may not be that far off when it comes to pain, according to a new study measuring brain activity.
Researchers at ATS 2015 reported chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, but was not independently linked to risk of stroke or systemic embolism.
Researchers at Oregon State University have identified zebrafish as an optimal testing model for toxoplasmosis, as they believe the fish could provide insight into breakthrough treatments.
Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) occurs after approximately 2% of primary hip or knee replacements and in up to 6% of revisions surgeries, and cost more than $50,000 per episode. A recent review found that many surgeons have altered their approaches to PJI management based on recent clinical findings.
$vAR$