HCPLive

Dr. Edward Magaziner on Treating Chronic Pain Conditions with Botox

$shareThis$

Edward Magaziner, MD, CEO, New Jersey Interventional Pain Society, Assistant Professor, New York Medical College, Clinical Professor, Robert Wood Johnson University Dept. of Anesthesia and PM&R, Medical Director, Center for Spine, Sports, Pain Management, and Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine, North Brunswick, NJ, details the chronic pain conditions he has successfully treated with Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA).

Aside from the drug's well-known cosmetic indications and its effectiveness in treating chronic migraine, Magaziner says Botox can be helpful in treating patients with chronic spasms and chronic nerve pain. For the latter group, Magaziner notes clinical studies have shown Botox injected in a grid-like fashion over the vicinity of a painful nerve decreases "some of the central sensitization that can occur after chronic nerve conditions." For chronic spasms, pain management physicians can inject Botox in the motor end-plate of a patient's muscle fiber to relieve spasticity caused by stroke or spinal cord injury, or to relax neck muscles and stop spasms in torticollis, Magaziner says.

"For people that have just some terrible spasms  who are not getting better through the use of physical therapy, massage, acupuncture, or some of the other techniques we use — when I have a last resort situation, I can always refer to Botox," Magaziner says.


Most Popular

Recommended Reading

Flare ups from rheumatoid arthritis can increase the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, according to research from the Mayo Clinic.
A common concern of expectant parents is what can increase the likelihood of their children being diagnosed with autism. A recent study found a link between exposure to gestational diabetes and autism risk.
Soligenix, Inc., a late-stage biopharmaceutical company, recently announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized a pivotal Phase 3 clinical trial to assess the efficacy of novel drug SGX203, a pediatric Crohn’s disease (CD) therapy.
Osteoarthritis (OA) patients may have an effective new treatment to look forward to following the development of self-donated fat cell therapy.
$vacMongoViewPlus$ $vAR$