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Dr. Kimme Hyrich Discusses Cancer Risk in RA Patients Receiving Anti-TNF Therapies

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Kimme L. Hyrich, MD, Arthritis Research UK Epidemiology Unit at University of Manchester, discusses the risk of rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy developing solid cancers.

“When they were first used and available for widespread use, there was a continuing anxiety about whether or not an agent which blocks tumor necrosis factor would actually increase the risk of cancer in patients with rheumatoid arthritis,” said Hyrich.

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