Man Sues Cell Phone Makers Over Hearing Loss

Researchers offer up conflicting evidence on the negative health effects of cell phone use. Michael R. Bennett, from California, doesn't care about research.

Researchers offer up conflicting evidence on the negative health effects of cell phone use. Michael R. Bennett, from California, doesn't care about research. He cares about his lost hearing, which he blames on cell phone manufacturers. So he sued.

It seems that every other week researchers confirm that cell phones are bad for our health, or confirm the opposite. In general, they are believed to be safe, though some governments have issued stricter warnings on their use than the U.S. government has. Motorola defended its products and mobile phones in general, saying, "Expert scientific panels and health agencies around the world have consistently confirmed the safety of the RF technology used in mobile phones."

One man believes that cell phones are bad for our health, and is taking manufacturers to court over it. Michael R. Bennett sued Motorola, Samsung and T-Mobile in California court. According to the court papers:

"On April 28, 2006, plaintiff suffered a sudden hearing loss in his right ear, vertigo, loss of equilibrium, and other personal injuries related thereto, and has continued to suffer the same injuries from said date through and including the present date. Upon plaintiff's information and belief, plaintiff's injuries were caused by electromagnetic radiation emanating from the Samsung cell phone and from the Motorola cell phone during plaintiff's use thereof, resulting from improper and unsafe design, manufacturing and production of the Samsung cell phone by defendant Samsung and of the Motorola cellphone by defendant Motorola, and by said defendants' respective failure to adequately warn of such dangers."

I have to wonder what Mr. Bennett's physician believes in this case. Surely he visited a physician. Did the doctor have no other explanation for the man's sudden ear-related problems than "Your cell phone did it!" I highly doubt it. While it's easy to point fingers at corporations with deep pockets, is there any way to conclusively prove that using a cell phone caused Mr. Bennett's hearing lost, vertigo and other problems?

Either way, the case has been moved from state court to federal court. We'll have to see what comes of it.