Which State Has the Worst EHR Usage By Far?

A shockingly large majority of physicians who intend to participate in the EHR Incentive Programs actually do not have the capability to support 14 of the 17 objectives.

Although the use of electronic health record (EHR) systems by office-based physicians has increased greatly year over year, the usage state by state varies greatly, according to a Data Brief from the National Center for Health Statistics.

In 2013, 78% of office-based physicians were using any type of EHR system, compared to 48% in 2009 and just 18% in 2001. However, only 48% of these physicians reported having a system that met the criteria for a basic EHR system. The adoption of basic EHR systems by office-based doctors was up 21% from the previous year.

New Jersey had the lowest percentage (21%) of physicians who had an EHR system that met the criteria for a basic system. Other states below the national average were Connecticut, Maryland, Nevada, Oklahoma, Vermont, West Virginia and Wyoming, according to the NCHS brief.

In contrast, North Dakota had the highest percentage (83%) of physicians with a basic EHR system. Minnesota, though, had the highest percentage (94%) of physicians using any type of EHR system. New Jersey, again, had the lowest (66%).

The national average for office-based physicians with a basic EHR system was 48%, with Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin significantly higher than the average.

The research also found that just 13% of office-based physicians both intend to participate in meaningful use incentives and had EHR systems that had the capabilities to support 14 of the 17 Stage 2 Core Set objectives. A huge majority (81%) of physicians intending to participate in the EHR Incentive Programs said they do not have systems with the capability to support 14 objectives.