Study Examines Exercises for Low Back Pain

Specifically focusing on afflicted back muscles when training, can help those suffering from back pain experience better results, according to study results published in the Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine.

Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine.

Specifically focusing on weak back muscles when training can help those suffering from back pain experience better results, according to study results published in the

 

"If you want to bring about physiological change to help the development and endurance of back muscles, you must focus your training on those specific muscles and not other muscular groups such as hip extensors," said study conductor Christian Larivière, a professor at the Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRSST).

 

The study included both healthy subjects and subjects with low back pain. The participants, ages 18 to 65, were asked to complete a variety of exercises. The level of activity and fatigue in certain muscles was measured by electromyography sensors while they performed.

 

A machine designed for back exercises was also used by the particpants and appeared to have some beneficial effects. The machine was designed to allow users to position themselves in a semi-sitting position. By using a cushion to stabilize the pelvis, the muscles responded better. Extending the legs also seemed to help strengthen the muscles. Researchers said the machine helps decrease the use of hip muscles and increase the use of back muscles.

 

Researcher Lariviere recommended, in a news release, that patients with severe hurt begin with stretches on the ground using low to medium effort. As the pain minimizes, the patient can then move onto using a similar machine.