The PMD Critical List: Does Healthcare Need Its 'Own Internet'?

An EHR executive says the healthcare industry needs will have its "own Internet" within the next five years. That story tops this week's PMD Critical List. Also on the List: Concerns that physicians are failing to adequately advise new mothers and a new CDC report which finds a small percentage of physicians are largely responsible for the overabundance of antibiotic prescriptions.

An EHR executive says the healthcare industry needs will have its "own Internet" within the next five years. That story tops this week’s PMD Critical List. Also on the List: Concerns that physicians are failing to adequately advise new mothers and a new CDC report which finds a small percentage of physicians are largely responsible for the overabundance of antibiotic prescriptions.

Healthcare Will Have Its ‘Own Internet’ Soon (CNBC)

The head of cloud EHR firm Athenahealth says resistance to the digitization of healthcare and health records is fading, but he says full integration of technology will require the healthcare industry to carve out its “own Internet” that balances the privacy and convenience. He sees Amazon as a role model for the healthcare industry.

Where Are Young Greek Doctors Finding Work? Germany (The Huffington Post)

Greece and Germany are on opposite sides in the Greek debt crisis, but it turns out Greek physician’s don’t have much of a problem with Germany. Greece has more physicians per capita than any country in Europe, about 1 per every 158 residents. As the Greek economy tanks, many are leaving for other countries, and one of the most popular doctor destinations is Germany.

Study: Some New Moms Get Too Little Advice From Doctors (USA Today)

New mothers rely on advice from their doctors, but a new survey finds a surprising number of moms receive no advice from their pediatricians regarding important matters like pacifier use and where and how the baby should sleep.

Almost Half of EU Doctors Seeking Work in the UK Lack Language Skills (The Guardian)

A medical degree can be a ticket to live in almost any country, but a new report from the UK shows that’s only the case if you have one other qualification — sufficient language skills. The UK’s General Medical Council says a whopping 45% of the 779 physicians who applied to work in the UK during the 2015 fiscal year were unable to prove they had sufficient English language skills.

CDC: Doctors Overprescribe Antibiotics (Consumer Affairs)

Here’s yet another report highlighting what many physicians already know: Antibiotics are over-prescribed. However, this study, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has a twist: The problem is limited to a relative handful of doctors. The CDC found 10% of providers prescribe antibiotics to 95% of patients who present with a cold, bronchitis, or other acute respiratory infection.

Chinese Doctors, Under Strain and Threat, Call for Support (The New York Times)

Last week we told you about how physicians in Russia are upset about their paltry paychecks. Now, doctors in China are voicing similar concerns. Physicians in Shanghai and Beijing have put up a video on a YouTube-like service describing their long hours and harsh work conditions and calling for better treatment. The video is generating quite a bit of buzz.

Selfies Spur More Cosmetic Surgery (Las Vegas Review-Journal)

The concept of “selfies” — quick self-portraits using a smartphone or tablet – draws plenty of eye rolls as a symbol of modern vanity. However, some plastic surgeons say it is also having medical consequences. “The fact that we have cameras with us all the time has created an increased awareness of our own features,” says one Nevada doc. He says that increased awareness leads to an increased desire to change some of those features.

The Best and Worst Time to Be a Physician (Forbes)

A physician and writer says new medical advancements mean it’s a great time to be a doctor in many ways. However, he says, “day-to-day medical practice is becoming more frustrating and problematic.”