The PMD Critical List: Female Cardiologists Lag in Number, Pay

Despite great gains in diversity in the medical profession as a whole, the US still has relatively few female cardiologists, according to a recent report. That story tops this week's PMD Critical List. Also on the list: why a good doctor might be "bad" for your health.

Despite great gains in diversity in the medical profession as a whole, the US still has relatively few female cardiologists, according to a recent report. That story tops this week’s PMD Critical List. Also on the list: why a good doctor might be “bad” for your health.

Female Cardiologists: Smaller in Numbers and Pay (Reuters)

“Some patients might prefer a female cardiologist, but would be hard pressed to find one.” An American College of Cardiology report finds that less than 10% of U.S. cardiologists are women and they earn an average of $110,000 less than their male colleagues.

“Let Food Be Thy Medicine”—Teaching Physicians to Cook (Mad in America)

“What we eat can heal both our bodies and brains,” however, just 25% of US medical schools require a dedicated nutrition course. Here's an interesting report on the Goldring Center at Tulane Medical School—which hired the first chef to be on a medical school faculty.

A First Look at Attitudes Surrounding Telehealth (HealthcareDive)

A new national survey on the attitudes, usage, and beliefs of physicians towards telemedicine shows 90% would participate provided they were reimbursed for their services. Other survey findings show that rural doctors are more likely (29%) to use telemedicine than those in urban areas (11%).

AMA Calls for an End to DTC Drug Ads (Ad Week)

The AMA: “an advertising ban reflects concerns among physicians about the negative impact of commercially-driven promotions, and the role that marketing costs play in fueling escalating drug prices.” The drug firms: “scientifically accurate direct-to-consumer ads provide information to patients that help make them better choices.”

The STD Epidemic Is Getting Worse (MD Magazine)

Cases of sexually transmitted diseases (chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis) have increased significantly, according to new CDC data. Health officials say the “epidemic is a clear call for better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.”

Are Good Doctors Bad for Your Health? (The New York Times)

“Both physicians and patients usually think more treatment means better treatment. We often forget that every test and treatment can go wrong, produce side effects or lead to additional interventions that themselves can go wrong.”

States Fail to Deliver Physician Quality Metrics (FierceHealthcare)

“When it comes to providing consumers with information on the quality of the healthcare that physicians provide, most states have a dismal record.” A total of 43 states flunked—California, Washington, and Minnesota all earned an A grade.

12 Books Every Business Person Must Read (Forbes)

Now more than ever, physicians must learn to educate themselves about the business world of medicine. “Not sure where to get started? Here is a short list of 12 great books that every business person must read.”

The Most Commonly Misdiagnosed Medical Conditions (Fox News)

According to a new report by the Institute of Medicine (a group not always friendly to doctors), “5% of adults who seek outpatient care experience a diagnosis that is delayed, wrong, or missed altogether.” Leading the miss list is heart attack.

Annual Income for the Top 1% by State (Mental Floss)

The most common occupation among the nation’s top 1% of all earners is a medical doctor, according to a recent survey. Here’s a 1%er breakdown by state— first is Connecticut at $677,608 per year; last is Arkansas at $228,298.

Doctors Debate Safety of the White Coat (The Boston Globe)

“The crisp white coat has long been worn to symbolize a profession and purity. But some studies show the coats are teeming with microbes picked up in patient rooms.” The issue “has assumed an intensity that surprises even its participants, exposing divisions that go beyond microbiology and touch on shifting perceptions of the physician’s role.”