Amassing the Clinical Evidence for Optimized Dyslipidemia Ma - Episode 16

The Potential for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction with PCSK9 Inhibitors

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The MD Magazine Peer Exchange “Amassing the Clinical Evidence for Optimized Dyslipidemia Management: Vitamin D, Long-Term Statin Outcomes, and PCSK9 Inhibition” features expert insight and analysis of the latest information on managing hypertension and hyperlipidemia, and in-depth discussion on the use of PCSK9 inhibitors in practice.

This Peer Exchange is moderated by Peter Salgo, MD, professor of medicine and anesthesiology at Columbia University and an associate director of surgical intensive care at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City.

The panelists are:

  • Christie Ballantyne, MD, Co-director of the Lipid Metabolism and Atherosclerosis Clinic at The Methodist Hospital, Director of the Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at the Methodist DeBakey Heart Center, and the Chief of Cardiology at Baylor College of Medicine
  • Keith C. Ferdinand, MD, Immediate Past Chair of the National Forum for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, and Professor of Clinical Medicine at the Heart and Vascular Institute at Tulane University School of Medicine
  • Jennifer G. Robinson, MD, MPH, Professor in the Departments of Epidemiology & Medicine and Director of the Prevention Intervention Center, Department of Epidemiology at the College of Public Health, University of Iowa
  • Karol E. Watson, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine and Cardiology, Co-director of the UCLA Program in Preventive Cardiology, and Director of the UCLA Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Health Program

While long-term safety data will be needed before any firm conclusions can be made about the safety of PCSK9 inhibitors, their efficacy results may put them in a position to replace statins in the future. Robinson shared the preliminary cardiovascular outcomes data from the PCSK9 safety studies, which showed a reduction in cardiovascular events in the PCSK9 group. These data need to be interpreted with caution, though, according to Ferdinand, because they were retrospectively obtained. Future prospective safety outcomes studies will need to be performed to provide the bigger safety picture.