Best Luxury Cars for 2014

Whether you're looking to lease or buy, 2014 should be a big year for luxury cars. These 10 cars are either all-new or significantly changed from previous models.

Whether you’re looking to lease (which is becoming more common among doctors) or buy, 2014 should be a big year for luxury cars.

According to The Car Connection, while 2013 was the year automakers refreshed the top-selling mainstream models, 2014 should be a year of new luxury cars with all-new and redesigned vehicles.

“With each model year, the term 'luxury' evolves just a bit, it seems—and the idea of what makes a luxury car has changed profoundly in the past decade or two,” according to TCC. “Everyone associates luxury with step-above comfort, top-tier materials, and exclusivity. That much has remained the same.”

Each year TCC compiles a list of nominees within specific auto categories of the vehicles that will be the best to buy in the coming year.

TCC rates cars on styling, performance, comfort, safety and features, and only cars that achieve an overall rating of at least an eight out of 10 will qualify as nominees. Vehicles must either be all new or changed significantly and have en entry price under $50,000.

Cars listed in alphabetical order.

Acura MDX

Overall rating: 8.6

MSRP: $43,185 to $56,505

Edmunds.com

Although consumers might call the MDX an SUV or a crossover, that’s not what Acura calls it. The latest version is not something you want to go off-roading with, according to TCC. The cabin is quieter now, but TCC had nothing good to say about the navigation and audio interfaces.

BMW 4-Series

Overall rating: 8.2

MSRP: $41,425 to $48,000

Edmunds.com

The BMW 4-Series Coupe is very similar to the 3-Series Sedan, but the car has a longer, wider and lower profile with two doors instead of four. TCC highlights the fact that the 4-series meets, if not surpasses, the driving experience of the 3-Series.

Cadillac CTS

Overall rating: 8.4

MSRP: $46,025 to $69,070

Edmunds.com

The CTS comes in three types: sedan, Vsport or Vsport premium. TCC looked at the sedan. (The other two models were more expensive than the $50,000 threshold.) The CTS is the lighter-weight cousin to the popular ATS and the car has “one of the best cabins in the business,” according to TCC.

Infiniti Q50

Overall rating: 8.2

MSRP: $37,955 to $48,500 (sedan) | $45,205 to $48,500 (hybrid)

Edmunds.com

The Q50 has a new look and a hybrid version now. The model is replacing the G37 sedan and has remedied the G Sedan’s cabin noise issue, according to TCC. The site also found the driving performance to be a joy.

Kia Cadenza

Overall rating: 8.2

MSRP: $35,900 to $42,400

Edmunds.com

Kia doesn’t call the Cadenza a luxury car, but don’t be fooled. In addition to a stick price that’s on par with the rest of the luxury cars on this list, the Cadenza is as well equipped as any other luxury-brand car.

Lexus IS

Overall rating: 8.0

MSRP: $36,860 to $38,485

Edmunds.com

The Lexus IS was redesigned with an edgier look, an improved interior, and better safety and features than the previous model, according to TCC.

Mercedes-Benz CLA

Overall rating: 8.2

MSRP: $30,825 to $47,450

Edmunds.com

The CLA is a scaled down version of the CLS and means that the company has two entry-level luxury cars. “…it's really no gamble, as we can see the CLA hitting the mark for a wide range of shoppers, from those who want an image boost to those who simply like its feature set and upscale materials inside,” according to TCC.