The PMD Critical List: Why Female Physicians Are Paid Less

A new study probes the lingering pay disparity between male and female physicians at US hospitals. That story tops this week's PMD Critical List. Also making the list: A look at smartphones are becoming more prevalent in US clinics, as are nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

A new study probes the lingering pay disparity between male and female physicians at US hospitals. That story tops this week’s PMD Critical List. Also making the list: A look at smartphones are becoming more prevalent in US clinics, as are nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

Why Female Physicians Are Paid Less (Science Daily)

A recent survey of US hospital physicians found that women made nearly $15,000 less than their male counterparts. The reasons? Implicit bias, differences in negotiations, and this: “female doctors' prioritize collegiality and control over personal time, rather than substantial pay.”

What Happens When Doctors Are Patients? (The Washington Post)

Interesting account about a Maine internist who had a bad hip replacement. “Decisions should be made by patients on the basis of what’s most important to them. They must find a way to talk to doctors about what their goals are.”

Most Physicians Use Smartphones to Access Patient Data (MobiHealthNews)

Has the “digital doc” arrived? A new survey shows that 52% of doctors now use a mobile device to access patient records or health reference data. Additionally, 31% used smartphones to manage patient care.

The Growing Role of PAs and NPs (USA Today)

New analysis of federal data show an expanding healthcare role for nurse practitioners and physician assistants nationwide—“getting paid more often for procedures people generally associate with doctors.” Their numbers are growing; while MDs shrink.

Pioneering Obesity Doctor, Jules Hirsh, Dies at 88 (The Washington Post)

The “physician-scientist who helped reframe the modern understanding of obesity by demonstrating that people do not become fatter or thinner simply by indulging in or depriving themselves of food,” is gone.

A Killer on the Loose (The Los Angeles Times)

Here’s a compelling report about a recent superbug outbreak at UCLA’s top hospital that spread like wild, killed and infected patients, and baffled doctors. A contaminated duodenoscope was the culprit.

Physician Who Helped Develop Use of CPR Dies (The New York Times)

Dr. James Jude, a Florida thoracic surgeon, “whose recognition that external manual pressure could revive a stalled heart,” has passed away at age 87. JAMA recently compared Dr. Jude’s breakthrough “to the discovery of penicillin.”

Medicare Turns 50—Big Challenges Await (Kaiser Health News)

Last week marked the 50th anniversary of the federal health insurance program for the elderly and disabled. With 10,000 people a day becoming eligible for Medicare, the program faces massive challenges. Here are the 5 biggies.