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Household Chemicals and Diabetes: A Surprising Link
A new analysis indicates that a 25% reduction in exposure to certain household chemicals would reduce diabetes cases by approximately 13%, enough to save billions of dollars in annual health costs.
Studies that found no connection are outliers, the authors of the new meta-analysis write. They believe the findings have been consistent enough to assert a certain link between pollution exposure and juvenile asthma, but they note that many important questions remain.
A team was able to demonstrate that spinal cord injury causes the relocation of some of the gut’s bacteria from sterile tissues to other locations throughout the body, and it appeared that these changes were linked to the activation of the immune system cells in the gut.
Empagliflozin was approved to reduce heart and stroke risk in patients with diabetes.
Several studies have shown that patients with sleep apnea are more likely than others to develop atrial fibrillation, but recent information indicates that any type of disrupted sleep may indicate an elevated risk.
At AHA 2016, Poushali Mukherjea, PhD, Bristol-Myers Squibb, was proud to present with her team 12 abstracts bringing in new scientific data covering real world data and sub analyses from their pivotal trial ARISTOTLE.
It is reportedly safe to use tissue plasminogen activator, the clot busting medication, on patients who wake up with symptoms of stroke, according to a new study. Generally, tPA should be administered within 4.5 hours of symptom onset to be considered effective.
As December 1 marks World AIDS Day, researchers report on the latest prevention and diagnosis strategies as well as a threat in the quest to eradicate the disease.
While one study found that taking vitamin D during pregnancy may hinder early ADHD symptoms, another recent study believes that gestational use of diabetes medications may lead to them.

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