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FDA Approves Another PCSK9 Inhibitor
The US Food and Drug Administration last night announced it has approved evolocumab (Repatha/Amgen), an injectable drug for some patients who are unable to get their LDL cholesterol under control. Statins are a cheaper and generally effective treatment, but the new class of drugs is expected to help people who cannot tolerate them, for whom they do not work, and for people with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.
Researchers report that nearly one in four patients with hepatitis C are denied initial approval for treatment.
Yoga has shown to improve heart health and benefit patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Even those with breast cancer have gotten in on the action. A new study in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine provides evidence that yoga offers progressive beneficial anti-stress benefits to members of a prison population.
A recent review in Chronic Wound Care Management and Research suggests that wound pruritus is not well understood and is often poorly treated, despite nearly a century of clinical investigation. Irritations of the skin can be as distressing for patients as pain, the authors noted; yet, there is no established treatment protocol for wound pruritus.
A new study in Nutrition Journal shows that patients suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) demonstrated significant improvement by taking fish oil supplements.
The US Food and Drug Administration approved a new glycemic control treatment for type 2 diabetes for adults, a combination product made of empagliflozin (Jardiance/ Boehringer Ingelheim) and metformin hydrochloride. It will be marketed as Synjardy in a joint venture with Eli Lilly.
A new review and meta-analysis finds that — despite the lack of drug-specific antidotes to arrest major bleeds — novel oral anticoagulants are associated with a lower risk of fatal bleeds than warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation.
Mobility is great. Hypermobility? Less great. In the joints, hypermobility leads to musculoskeletal pain – and often times, lots of it. A recent review in the Journal of Pain Research outlined several of the challenges in treating generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) and found many difficult questions and few easy answers.
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) updated labeling for rilpivirine, marketed under the name Edurant, for the treatment of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The changes have been made in the dosage and administration, warnings and precautions, adverse reactions, and clinical information sections.

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